The Evolution of Commenting Online – Part 1

My students and I have been looking at this poster during all of our digital citizenship lessons. After exploring what it means to be a digital citizen, we have returned to this poster to guide and set a purpose for each new lesson. For example, when we talked about being kind online, we were focusing on the “heart” of a digital citizen. When we discussed personal and private information, we talked about “wearing our thinking caps” before we share information online. When we talked about rules for being safe online, we discussed listening to our gut feeling.

Today, when I opened the “commenting” feature on our Seesaw app (one of the apps I am exploring for my final project), I brought this poster up again for my students to see and asked which part of a digital citizen must we engage when we think about commenting on other people’s work. Of course, they responded with: respect themselves and others.

 

main-qimg-beb0e280ad8e6d2cc9ba5ba5bef26ba5-c

In order to guide our thinking about how to comment, we looked at this graphic and discussed what each element meant, along with examples. This included the discussion that random emojis, using for example 30 smiley faces or 28 exclamation marks would fall under the category of unnecessary. For our first go at commenting, we focused on the elements true, helpful, necessary and kind (we left out inspiring because we just aren’t there yet!) and the kids were excited to start commenting right away.

My students work on Seesaw during Daily 5 so they got started on this as soon as their group was at that station. They assignment for today was a short one (take a picture of their Ted Harrison art project) and write a caption explaining how they imitated his art style. This was a short assignment so that they had time to comment on the work of others and explore some of the comments that had been left for them by me. Their comments have to be approved by me before they are posted so they weren’t able to see comments from their peers right away.

After two days (when all groups had made it through this station and their first chance at commenting), I put all of the comments up on the screen for the kids to see. We filtered through each one deciding if it fit into our THNK (no I yet!) model. Some of the kids were surprised that I put their comment up for everyone to read (even though it is visible to everyone in the class through the app). This allowed us a teachable moment about the permanency and availability of their online actions. This also gave us an opportunity to talk about the “grandma rule” (they thought the name was hilarious!)

What we discovered as a class was that most of their posts were two things: true and kind. Here are some examples:

There were a few that went beyond the true and kind model to include helpful and necessary as well. Here are some of those examples:

This is just the beginning of my students and their learning how to comment. Next week we will be adding another layer of rules that comments must include in order to be approved! Stay tuned!

Advertisements

One thought on “The Evolution of Commenting Online – Part 1

  1. Hi Brooke! Thanks for this great post. 🙂 It’s so nice to see what others are up to in their classrooms. I LOVE the graphic you use at the beginning of your post – I am absolutely going to borrow your idea with the intention for each lesson coming back to a certain part of the digital citizen. I think it’s a really great, all encompassing focus. Thanks again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s