Is Bitmoji the New Face of Your Digital Identity?

As described by Bitmoji.com, “Bitmoji is your own personal emoji. Create an expressive cartoon avatar, choose from a growing library of moods and stickers – featuring YOU! Put them into any text message, chat or status update”. There are over 1.9 septillion different combinations to make your bitmoji look just like you. Sometimes, I am kind of creeped out by how much my friend’s bitmoji’s really do look just like them.

So, how do you make one?

Bitmojis are are fun way to respond to messages in a variety of apps. I have been using Bitmoji for a few weeks now and really enjoy the creativity it allows me in conversations via text and Snapchat especially. Snapchat has recently introduced Friendmojis. To check out how to use Friendmojis, click here.

Bitmoji (owned by the software company Bitstrips) is a Toronto based company that was started by high school friends Jacob Blackstock and Jesse Brown in 2008 with the original intent of providing a web-based service for people to create their own comics without having to be good artists. In 2016, Snap Inc. (the company that owns Snapchat), bought Bitmoji. As I have discussed in earlier posts, Snapchat is one of the apps I am exploring for my major project.

Source  – Bitmoji now allows you to take a picture so that you can make your real image to your avatar.

Common Sense Education provides a good review of how this tool can be used in the classroom including as a safer profile picture for students to use at school. The review offers it’s own bottom line: that Bitmoji wasn’t necessarily made with education in mind but that they are many cool users for the app in the classroom. One interesting suggestion this review gives is for students to use Bitmoji as a way of representing characters in books or other texts. I know this simple idea opens up many possibilities in my mind for uses in the classroom. Remember, you must be 13 to sign up for the app though so best reserve this for high school students.

So, why do people love Bitmoji so much? Several sources that I have scoured for this blog post suggest that it provides the kind of face-to-face (if you can call it that) interaction that text message bubbles do not. Young people aren’t the only ones using it either. Most of my 25-30 year old friends are using Bitmojis. My youngest teenage cousin is using a Bitmoji and so are people I know that are similar in age to my parents.

What do you think of this reason for loving Bitmojis presented in the Forbes Magazine article The Inside Story of Bitmojis: Why We Love Them, How They Make Money, Why They are Here to Stay?

So, EC&I832 classmates, do you think Bitmoji fits into the emerging definition of digital identity?

Check out how the new selfie feature makes it even easier to create a Bitmoji in the image of your IRL self using the selfie option:


If you don’t have a Bitmoji already, here is how you can get one and then download it onto Snapchat:

 

How do you think I did?

Before you download Bitmoji or Snapchat to your phone, make sure to check out their Privacy Policy and Terms of Service. Lucky for you, Bitmoji and Snapchat operate under the same Privacy Policy under their company, Snap Inc. You can check out my review of Snap Inc.’s Privacy Policy here.

As for the Terms of Service, by creating a Bitmoji, you grant them the following rights:

“Rights You Grant Us: Some of our Services let you create, upload, post, send, receive, and store content. When you do that, you retain whatever ownership rights in that content you had to begin with. But you grant us and our affiliates a worldwide, royalty-free, sublicensable, and transferable license to host, store, use, display, reproduce, modify, adapt, edit, publish, and distribute that content including in connection with marketing and promotions for as long as you use the Services…You alone though remain responsible for the content you create, upload, post, send, or store through our Services…just know that we can use your ideas without compensating you”.

So, please be informed before you engage with this app and any new app for that matter!

Have you used Bitmoji? Do you like it? What apps have you used it with? What do you think of it as making text messages or chats appear like a more face-to-face human interaction? Do you see it as a way to create your digital identity online? IMG_1965

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3 thoughts on “Is Bitmoji the New Face of Your Digital Identity?

  1. Pingback: This is the final countdown | Jocelyncarr's Weblog

  2. Love the use of bitmoji I think students would love it. I see the 13 years old term being an issue as well so maybe just high school students. I love using bitmoji and I find it adds to some of the snaps that are sent makes things more interesting. I love the idea of using it for a profile picture too. I just figured out the picture to create the bitmoji a few weeks ago and I think it works very well.

  3. A very clever application. Thanks for sharing, and reviewing! I hadn’t heard of it before your post. It looks like a lot of fun, and just the kind of thing to personalize an avatar without putting our literal face to it.

    I appreciate your review of the privacy agreement as well. As standard as clauses like those seem to be, they raise eyebrows nonetheless. We at least need to be using the app fully aware that our digital likeness can be the face of their next advertising campaign…

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